King Tut Exhibition Opens In Seattle

To download artifact images, visit National Geographic's FTP site:

http://ftp.nationalgeographic.com/pressroom/tut_golden_king_exhibit/

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CONTACTS:

Katelyn Del Buco
PR Specialist, King Tut exhibit
Pacific Science Center, Seattle
(206) 269-5728 / (831) 332-3631(cell)
kdelbuco@pacsci.org

THE EMERALD CITY IS AGLOW WITH THE TREASURES OF TUT KING TUT EXHIBITION OPENS FOR FINAL U.S. STOP AT PACIFIC SCIENCE CENTER

SEATTLE - (May 24, 2012) - The highly anticipated exhibition Tutankhamun: The Golden King and the Great Pharaohs opened today at Pacific Science Center for the final showing in North America. More than 30 years after the first King Tut exhibition captivated Seattle, the magic and mystery of the boy king returns to the Pacific Northwest with an almost entirely new selection of treasures and more than twice the number of artifacts.

Upon discovery of the tomb, British archaeologist Howard Carter said, "Everywhere, the glint of gold." Carter's words have never rung truer than now to describe the arrival of the grandest exhibition in the world. The community's early response to the opening of the exhibition has been unparalleled with over 90,000 tickets sold and field trips for school groups booked until the fall.

The exhibition features more than 100 artifacts from the tomb of King Tut and sites representing some of the most important rulers throughout 2,000 years of ancient Egyptian history. Most of these artifacts have never been on display in the United States before this exhibition.

"This is an exciting time for not only Pacific Science Center, but for our state and region," said Bryce Seidl, president and CEO for Pacific Science Center. "We have the great pleasure to be hosting the final showing in North America of the most special exhibition in the world. We are so excited to be able to bring the King Tut exhibit to our region as part of our 50th year of community focused programs and events that showcase science, technology, history, culture and the imaginative spirit we cherish here in the Northwest."

Come face-to-face with the largest image of King Tut ever unearthed - a 10-foot-statue of the pharaoh found at the remains of the funerary temple of two of his high officials. See authentic objects from King Tut's tomb including jewelry, furniture and statuary, as well as the boy king's golden sandals - created specifically for the afterlife and found covering his feet when his mummified remains were discovered by Carter. An extraordinary gold death mask that covered the head and chest of the mummy of King Psusennes I will also be showcased along with artifacts belonging to some of ancient Egypt's most powerful rulers, such as Khufu, whose face adorns the Great Sphinx and who built one of the Great Pyramids, the only remaining structures of the seven wonders of the ancient world.

New scientific discoveries continue to provide insight into King Tut's legendary life and death. The exhibition features a 3D replica of King Tut's mummy, (the actual mummy has never left the Valley of the Kings in Egypt), as well as the first CT scans of the young king's mummy obtained as part of a landmark Egyptian research and conservation project, partially funded by the National Geographic Society. The majority of proceeds from the tour support the preservation and conservation of antiquities and monuments in Egypt, including construction of the new Grand Egyptian Museum in Giza.

As part of the total experience, and in addition to an audio guide narrated by award-winning actor Harrison Ford ($6), Pacific Science Center will feature two IMAX films: Mummies: Secrets of the Pharaohs, and Mysteries of Egypt. Mummies: Secrets of the Pharaohs takes audiences on a journey to the royal tombs of Egypt, exploring the history of ancient Egyptian society as told through the mummies of the past. A National Geographic film, Mysteries of Egypt, transports audiences to a distant time and place where the Nile River Valley cuts an emerald swath through the desert sands. Both films are free for members.

As the Science Center approaches its 50th anniversary on October 22, 2012, the institution is as committed as ever to serving the community and being an engine for creative and critical thinking for the Pacific Northwest. Bringing diverse programming and exhibits from around the world to the community is at the heart of Pacific Science Center's mission. As part of that effort, the Science Center is proud to bring King Tut back to Seattle.

GETTING TO THE EXHIBIT
Due to the high volume of events around Seattle Center during the Science Center's King Tut exhibition opening weekend, please be aware that traffic conditions will be congested and heavier than usual. For more information regarding road conditions and alternative modes of transportation to the Seattle Center, please visit SDOT or WSDOT.

EXHIBITION ORGANIZERS AND PARTNERS
Tutankhamun: The Golden King and the Great Pharaohs is organized by National Geographic and Arts & Exhibitions International, with cooperation from the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities. Northern Trust is a proud cultural partner. American Airlines is the official airline of the exhibition. The exhibition in Seattle is sponsored by Seattle's Convention & Visitors Bureau.

TICKETS AND INFORMATION
For further information and ticket details please visit pacificsciencecenter.org/king-tut. Discounted tickets for Pacific Science Center members and groups of 10 or more are available. Groups interested in purchasing tickets can call (206) 443-3611. The exhibition runs through Jan. 6, 2013.

ABOUT PACIFIC SCIENCE CENTER
Located under the arches near the Space Needle, Pacific Science Center serves approximately one million guests on site and more than 300,000 students, teachers and families throughout Washington state each year. Pacific Science Center began as the United States Science Pavilion during the 1962 Seattle World's Fair. Millions came to explore the wonders of science during the World's Fair and upon closing ceremonies, the Science Pavilion was given new life as the private not-for-profit Pacific Science Center, becoming the first U.S. museum founded as a science and technology center. On July 22, 2010 Pacific Science Center was declared a City of Seattle Landmark. Pacific Science Center is committed to providing accessibility for all guests.